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Full text of "Historical sketch of Grace Reformed Church"

George Washington Flowers 
Memorial Collection 

DUKE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 

ESTABLISHED BY THE 
FAMILY OF 
COLONEL FLOWERS 



DUKE 
UNIVERSITY 




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NEWS POWER PKESSES, NEWTOIf, X. C. 




Rev. W. H. STUBBEEBINE. Ph. D, 



INTRODUCTORY. 



REVERENCE for sacred places is as old as the religious 
instinct in man. The most precious memories of our 
earthly pilgrimage cluster about the places where we 
have held communion with God, where in an ecstasy of soul 
we have caught glimpses of the divine glory. The church 
represents the highest interests of the soul. It is the place 
to which we resort in times ot sorrow and trouble, as well as 
the place where we have united heart and voice in songs of 
praise. Truly, there is no other spot on all the earth so dear 
to the devout soul as the church. It was here in infancy we 
were consecrated to the Lord by the rite of holy baptism ; it 
was here we assumed the vows of our formal enlistment in the 
service of the Lord ; it was before its altar that the bans were 
pronounced uniting us in bonds of matrimony ; it was from 
this place the mortal remains of our loved ones have been car- 
ried to their last resting place. Is it not natural, then, that 
the heart should cling to a place so fraught with precious mem- 
ories of the past ? Do we not, then, do well to encourage this 
veneration for our spiritual home by preserving its history, 
that we may hand it down to our children and our children's 
children ? Sad will be the day when the children forget the 
precious heritage which they have received from the past. 
With a sincere desire to enshrine in the heart of coming gen- 
erations this love for the House of the Lord have we been led 
to gather up the fragments of the history of Grace Reformed 
Church and present them in this permanent form. It is 
much regretted that there exists no records of the early history 
of the congregation. The original roll of members, if any was 
ever kept, has been lost, so that the early years of the church's 
history is shrouded in more or less uncertainty. We have 
tried, however, to preserve only what can be vouched for on 
authority. 

In 1 8 — the consistory of the church authorized the late 



2 



HISTORY OF GRACE REFORMED CHURCH. 



Judge McCorkle to prepare a history of the congregation. We 
have been informed that such an account was prepared and 
published in the Corinthian, but unfortunately it is not available 
for use in this sketch. There was no one better qualified for 
this work than Judge McCorkle. He lived through its early 
days and was familiar with all its achievements. But this 
father in Israel has passed over into the great beyond, and w r e 
have no help from that source. But we have consulted others 
and from them we have learned the facts connected with the 
first twenty-five years of the church's history. 

From 1873 on a comparatively full and complete record has 
been kept, and the facts herewith presented, from that time 
down to the present, can be accepted as authentic. 





GRACE REFORMED CHURCH. 



HISTORY OF 

GRACE REFORMED CHURCH. 



RIOR to 1845, what now constitutes the counties of 



Catawba and Lincoln was one count}', called Lincoln. 



This whole section of country was settled by Pennsyl- 
vania Germans, who began to arrive as earl}- as 1745 As was 
their custom, one of the first duties these settlers sought to 
perform was to provide school houses for the education of their 
children and houses wherein they might worship God. The 
first church that was established in this territory was St. 
Pauls, a union Reformed and Lutheran church, in 1760. This 
building was replaced by another in 181 2 and still stands, hav- 
ing been used constantly for sendees. From all sections of 
this extensive territory journeyed the devout German to this 
shrine to worship the God of his fathers. When, in 1845, 
Catawba County was formed and the town of Newton was 
organized, it was deemed expedient to organize a Reformed 
congregation at Newton, and accordingly a number of mem- 
bers of St. Paul's congregation withdrew to organize the con- 
gregation at Newton. This organization was effected in 1845, 
during the pastorate of Rev. J. H. Crawford, by the election 
of Abel Ikerd and Daniel Rowe as elders. The new congrega- 
tion became a member of the Catawba charge, then consisting of 
St. Paul's, Smyrna, St. John's and Matthews. Rev. Crawford 
continued to serve the charge until 1856, when he moved to 
Virginia. 

About 1848 the newly organized congregation undertook to 
build a church. This church was completed about 1849 and 
was the first church built in Newton. It still stands as a land- 
mark of those early days. It has always been commonly called 
the "White Church," from the fact that it was painted white. 

Up to 1850 all those who ministered to the congregations in 





3 



4 HISTORY OF GRACE REFORMED CHURCH. 



North Carolina had come from the North or had received their 
education North. It was deemed inexpedient and very expen- 
sive to send our young men North for their theological train- 
ing, and at the suggestion of the Hon. Judge M. E. McCorkle 
plans were set on foot looking to the establishment of a 
Reformed College. At this time a Reformed minister, Rev. 
C. H. Albert, had been conducting an academy, which became 
the nucleus for the new college, and accordingly the school 
was transferred to the £< White Church," where sessions were 
held until the college building was completed. It was on the 
platform of the " White Church" that the graduates of the 
college held their commencement exercises until about the 
time of the building of the new church, when these services 
were transferred to the college chapel. 

Ever since the founding of the college the members of Grace 
Church have been its most loyal supporters, contributing of 
their time and money and labor to make it a success. Among 
its most devoted supporters were such men as Major S. M. 
Finger, Judge M. L. McCorkle, R. F. Reinhardt and others. 
These have been succeeded by such men as M. J. Rowe, Col. 
W. H. Williams, J. F. Smyre and George McCorkle, Esq., 
than whom no more devoted men can be found. To make the 
college a success and a credit to the church is the highest 
ambition of these men. 

So extensive was the territory and so scarce was the supply 
of ministers that the few who heroically undertook work here 
had to do herculean work. There were then no sinecures to 
be found. Every man stood ready to spend and be spent in 
the service of the Master. Toward the close of the fifties Rev. 
A, S. Vaughan, of Doylestown, Pa., was elected presi- 
dent of the college, and also ministered as opportunity pre- 
sented to the Newton congregation. The trend of affairs at 
this time had instilled doubts and forebodings. Events fol- 
lowed thick and fast, and ere long the mutterings of war were 
distinctly heard, and when, on April 12, 1861, Fort Sumpter 
was bombarded, the hopes which had begun to shine so brightly 
for the college and the church were suddenly extinguished. 
That any trace of college or church should exist at this period 
of the war is a source of wonder, but while sire and son, stal- 



HISTORY OF GRACE REFORMED CHURCH. 



5 



wart and brave, fought, bled and died, the faith of those at 
home still burned upon the altar of the heart and the Sanctu- 
ary of the Lord was not forsaken. During the war Rev. John 
Eantz preached for Grace Church and for some time after, pos- 
sibly until 1869, when J. C. Clapp was ordained and began his 
ministry. 

During these unsettled times no attempt was made to adhere 
to metes and bounds in pastoral charges. These ministers 
considered the whole country their parish and preached where- 
ever and whenever the}' could. Hence there was little regu- 
larity in preaching appointments. It is possible that others 
during the fifties may have preached in Grace Church, but 
probably only occasionally, and not as located pastors. 

In 1875 Revs. J. C. Clapp and J. A. Foil were secured as 
supply for the year at a salary of five hundred dollars, to be 
divided equally between them If more than this amount 
could be collected it was to be given them. In 1876, at a 
meeting of the Joint Consistory, the advisability of reconstruct- 
ing the Catawba and Grace charges was earnestly discussed, 
but no feasible solution presenting itself, it was decided to 
leave the charges in their present condition, to be supplied 
with preaching as before, with the addition of Rev. J. H. Shu- 
ford. Again, in 1877, the division of the charge was discussed, 
but the only advance made over the former manner of supply- 
ing the churches was that Rev. J. C. Clapp was to be the rec- 
ognized pastor of the Catawba charge and Rev. J. A. Foil the 
pastor of the Grace charge. It was also agreed that these 
ministers should alternate in their preaching, as they might 
arrange between them. But evidently this arrangement was 
not satisfactory, for later in the same year we find the consist- 
ories discussing some satisfactory division of the territory. 
The field was entirely too large for these two brethren to suc- 
cessfully handle, they already having a great burden resting 
on them in their efforts to conduct the work in Catawba Col- 
lege. At this meeting an effort was made to unite the Hickory 
and Newton congregations into a pastoral charge, with the 
expectatation that Rev. F. F. Banner would become the pastor. 
Rev. Banner, however, did not accept the call, and in conse- 
quence the reconstruction of the charges was not consummated. 



6 HISTORY OF GRACE REFORMED CHURCH. 



It was inevitable that something must be done in order to get 
the several congregations into good working order. In 1878 
reconstruction was effected and Rev. J. C. Clapp became the 
pastor of Catawba charge, with a salary of three hundred doll- 
ars. After a pastorate of three years Dr. Clapp tendered his 
resignation, but the consistory declined to accept it and he 
continued to serve the charge. . In 1882 Rev. G. Dickie Gurley 
assisted Dr. Clapp in his ministerial work to the edification of 
the people. Again, in 1884, Dr. Clapp tendered his resigna- 
tion, which was at this time accepted. During the year that 
Dr. Clapp resigned, Rev. J. F. Hartzell, of Pennsylvania, 
visited the charge with a view r to becoming pastor, but 
lie declined to accept a call to a charge covering so great 
a territory. The Committee of Supply then made over- 
tures to the Rev. S. E. Whitmore, of Virginia, but he being 
unable to secure a successor in his charge, declined to leave 
it. Then the congregation had to fall 'back on the one who 
had always stood read}' to fill the breach and Dr. Clapp was 
again called to the pastorate. It appears that the Newton 
congregation was financially unable to meet its obligations, 
and in 1886 an appeal was made to the Board of Missions for 
sustentation, but it is unknown whether this assistance was 
secured. 

In 1883 the annual meeting of the Synod of the Potomac held 
its session in the church. While the Reformed Church in 
North Carolina ante-dates the American Revolution and these 
early German settlers remained true and loyal to the church of 
their fathers, this was the first time in its history that so impor- 
tant a body met within its confines. Both the members of the 
Classis and Synod looked forward to the meeting with mingled 
feelings. The church North had but little conception of the 
trials through which the fathers had passed in their allegiance 
to the church. The connection between the classis of North 
Carolina and the Synod had not been of the closest, and hence 
neither knew much about the other. Some of the members of 
the Synod remarked that they had expected to be met at the 
depot with an ox-cart and be fed on corn bread and fat side 
meat. But how graciously they were surprised ! If those who 
attended that meeting will let memory have sway they will 



HISTORY OF GRACE REFORMED CHURCH. 7 



recall with much pleasure the short time they spent in the 
midst of this congregation. There is no doubt but that this 
meeting- left a great impression on the congregation, and many 
of the members still cherish the names of the ministers and 
elders whom they then entertained. If any of the delegates 
who attended the meeting of Synod in 1883 are in attendance 
at the meeting of Synod this year at Salisbury and will visit 
Newton the}' will find that neither the town nor congregation 
has been standing still during the intervening years. Grace 
Church expects to get some benefit from the presence of so great 
a company of the servants of the Lord in her midst. 

In February, 1886, the congregation decided to build a new 
and more modern house of worship, and Rev. J. C, Clapp, D. 
D., Col. W. H. Williams and D. F. Moose were appointed a 
building committee. The congregation entered enthusiastic- 
ally upon this work ; sufficient pledges were secured to assure 
success to the undertaking. The corner stone was laid in 1887, 
the Rev. J. C. Clapp, D. D., preaching the sermon. In 1888 
the edifice was completed and ready for dedication. The ded- 
icatory sermon was preached by Dr. Clapp and the day was 
one of great rejoicing to all the people. The church is a mod- 
ern Gothic building, comfortabty furnished and seats about 
400. It is unfortunate that no statement of the cost of the 
building is in existence, but we have been told that it was 
erected at a very low figure. The building of the new church 
was the last and most important work which Dr. Clapp ren- 
dered to the congregation, for in April, 1890, he tendered his 
resignation. That his ministry was a faithful and fruitful one 
is attested by the lives and character of those who claim him 
as their spiritual father. But it was impossible to successfully 
carr}' on both the work of Catawba College, of which he was 
president, and the pastorate of a growing congregation, and on 
this account he surrendered the pastorate. 

For two years after Dr. Clapp' s resignation the church was 
without the services of a regular pastor, but preaching was 
held as often as opportunity afforded. Efforts had been made 
to secure a pastor, but without avail. 

During this interim the congregation decided to become an 
independent charge. The town of Newton was growing and 



8 HISTORY OF GRACE REFORMED CHURCH. 



it was felt that the congregation could make greater progress 
if it had the undivided time of the pastor, and an overture was 
sent to Classis requesting a division of the charge. The request 
was granted, and in 1892 Grace Congregation was constituted 
an independent charge, the first and only one at that time in 
the Classis. 

The flock began to show the effects of having no shepherd, 
and more strenuous efforts were put forth to secure a pastor. 
In 1891 correspondence was opened with Mr. Andrew H. Smith, 
of Reading, Penna., then a student of theology in the Eastern 
Theological Seminary at Lancaster, Penna , resulting in an 
invitation to visit Newton and preach for the congregation. 
Mr. Smith accepted the invitation, and immediately after his 
graduation, examination and licensure in 1892, he came South. 
But in* less than three weeks after his arrival typhoid fever laid 
its arresting hand on the prospective pastor. The cougrega 
gation did everything possible to minister to the needs of the 
strangei within their midst, and in due time he recovered and 
returned to his native state to recuperate his strength, So 
deeply impressed was Mr. Smith with the kind ministrations 
of the members of Grace Church that when they extended to 
him a unanimous call to become their pastor he accepted the 
call and returned to Newton and was ordained to the gospel 
ministry and installed pastor of the congregation on Sunday, 
October 9, 1892, by the following Classical Committee : Revs. 
J. C. Clapp, D. D. , J. A, Foil, Ph. D., and J. L- Murphy, D. D. 
Dr. Foil preached the ordination sermon, Dr. Murphy preached 
the installation sermon and Dr. Clapp conducted the ordina- 
tion and installation. 

The congregation at once rallied to the support of their new 
pastor. Though inexperienced in the work, he manifested 
great enthusiasm and zeal, and soon all the machinery of the 
congregation was in effective operation and the future w 7 as 
bright with promise. Services were held every Sunday morn- 
ing and two Sunday nights each month. For some time after 
the completion of the new church the Sunday School contin- 
ued to hold its sessions in the old "White Church," but was 
transferred to the new church in 1893* 

Shortly after beginning his ministry it was discovered that 



HISTORY OF GRACE REFORMED CHURCH. 



Rev. Smith was planning to take unto himself a wife, and as 
the congregation had no parsonage, plans were at once laid to 
build one. Subscriptions were soon secured covering the cost 
of the building and the contract was let for a modern house to 
cost $I,6oo. But before the completion of the parsonage the 
panic of '93 struck the country, and in consequence the build- 
ing committee was short five hundred dollars in unpaid sub- 
scriptions, Rev. Smith, however, came to their rescue and 
agreed to pay eight dollars per month for the rental of the 
house until the five huudied dc!lars were paid. This he con- 
tinued to do during his pastoia 2, and when he left less than 
one hundred dollars were unpaid, which has since been paid. 
The parsonage building committee consisted of Col. W. H. 
Williams and Solomon Shrum. 

Up to 1895 the congregation had no bell in the belfry. The 
old bell in the "White Church" had served the purpose of 
ringing forth the glad invitation to all people to assemble for 
worship. This bell, it seems, belonged to Rev. J. C. 
Clapp, D. D,, and was claimed by him. The church, there- 
fore, had no bell, but Brother Solomon Shrum took it upon 
himself to investigate the matter, and ere many days had 
passed; a fine, sweet-toned bell was swinging in the belfry, his 
personal gift to the congregation. The bell cost one hundred 
dollars. The consitory, in appreciation of this act, passed the 
following resolution : 

Resolved, That the consistory and congregation highly appre- 
ciates both the gift and example of Bro. Solomon Shrum and 
extend to him their most hearty thanks and commends his 
example as a steward of the good things God has given him as 
worthy of imitation, 

Bro. Smith was an indefatigable worker who, by his personal 
interest in the members, succeeded in imparting his spirit of 
enthusiasm to the whole congregation. The Ladies' Aid 
Society, that right arm of power in every congregation, did 
valiant service in raising funds to liquidate s'ome old debts left 
over from the church and also in raising funds for the parson- 
age. A missionary society was organized, and during its life- 
time raised some thirty dollars for home and foreign missions. 



io HISTORY OF GRACE REFORMED CHURCH. 



During Bro. Smith's pastorate $5,903 were raised for congre- 
gational purposes and $584 for general benevolence. 

For some time Bro. Smith had been holding services at 
Witherspoon School House, about five miles distant from town. 
Here lived a little band of members loyal to their church, but 
unable to attend its services regularly in town. Classis author- 
ized the organization of a congregation here. A plot of ground 
was purchased by the Wilson Brothers and plans were laid for 
the building of a chapel, but before this could be consummated 
Bro. Smith resigned. 

During his pastorate sixty-six were added to the church, 
forty by confirmation, twenty-three by letter and three by 
re-piofession of faith. During this time death made many 
visits to the families of the congregation, but his greatest trophy 
was when Maj. S. M. Finger was transferred to the church 
triumphant. Major Finger had been a pillar of strength in 
the congregation, and it was felt that with his death the con- 
gregation had suffered an irreparable loss. 

In July, 1897, Rev. Smith was challenged by the Board of 
Home Missions to accept the pastorate of the mission at Mc- 
Keesport, Pa. Bro. Smith accepted the call and resigned the 
pastorate of Grace Church in August, 1897. 

During no similar period of time was so much accomplished 
as during Rev. Smith's pastorate. He was universally loved, 
the people supported him in all his plans and did effective ser- 
vice in helping him realize the hopes he had entertained for the 
prosperity of the congregation. 

After the resignation of Rev. Smith the consistory made 
arrangements with Revs. J. C. Clapp, J. A. Foil and P. M. 
Trexler to supply the pulpit until a regular pastor could be 
secured. Each of these brethren was to preach on alternate 
Sundays and to receive five dollars per Sunday for their services, 
This arrangement was continued until November. 

On September 19, 1897, Rev. W. A. Long, Ph. D. , was 
called to the pastorate at a salary of five hundred dollars and 
parsonage. Dr. Long began his ministry on Sunday, Novem- 
ber 21, and was formally installed in May, 1898, by the follow- 
ing Committee of Classis: Revs. J. C. Clapp, D. D., J. L. 
Murphy, D, D., and T. C, Hesson. 



HISTORY OF GRACE REFORMED CHURCH. 1 1 



Dr. Long's pastorate continued during three and a half 
years. It was an uneventful period and no unusual work was 
done. In 1898 the annual meeting of Classis was held in the 
church and much good was derived from the presence of so 
many of God's servants. 

During Dr. Long's pastorate the congregation was called 
upon to suffer another grievous loss in the death of Judge M. 
L. McCorkle, than whom no person contributed so much to 
the prosperity of the congregation, both material and spiritual. 
Bro. A. D. Shuford, an elder and secretary of the consistory, 
also passed to his eternal reward. 

For some time Dr. Long had contemplated resigning, and 
finally severed his connection with the charge May 1, 1901, 

Immediately upon the resignation of Dr. Long, Rev. W, H. 
Stubblebine, Ph. D., who had just resigned his pastorate in 
Ohio, was secured to supply the pulpit until other arrange- 
ments could be made. He began his ministry on the second 
Sunday in May, 1901. It was with no intention whatever of 
becoming pastor of the charge that he entered upon his work, 
but so great was the interest manifested by the congregation 
and the insistence of the consistory that he finally decided to 
allow his name to be placed in nomination. The election was 
held on Sunday. July 21, when he was unanimously elected 
and a call extended at a salary of six hundred dollars and par- 
sonage. The formal installation took place on Sunday, March 
23, 1902, by the following committee of Classis: Revs. J. L. 
Murphy, D. T>. , J. A. Foil, Ph. D., and.H. E. Sechler. 

The pastorate of Dr. Stubblebine began under the most 
favorable auspices, For some time the congregation had been 
disintegrating. Members had grown indifferent and many were 
contemplating a change in their church relations. The young 
people, especially, had lost all interest. For some years the 
congregation had suffered some heavy losses in the death of its 
most devoted servants, and it was a problem as to whether the 
younger generation would be willing to assume the grave 
responsibilities of office in the House of the Lord, Whatever 
fears existed on this score were soon dispelled, as the sons of 
the deceased valiantly stepped forth to have the mantle of 
authority placed on their shoulders. At no time since has 



i2 HISTORY OF GRACE REFORMED CHURCH. 



there been shirking and all have stood nobly to the work of 
the Lord. 

Shortly after beginning his work, death again entered the 
fold and claimed Deacon D. F. Moose. Ah, what a loss that 
was ! Who can forget that genial, warm-hearted soul? What 
a faculty he had for getting money to pay the expenses of the 
church! Truly he is missed, and a suitable successor has not 
yet been found. 

Dr. Stubblebine inaugurated his pastorate with a series of 
evangelistic meetings for two weeks in October. What meet- 
ings they were! How the spirit seemed to draw men and 
women to repentance ! Night after night, as the pastor 
preached, it was evident that the Holy Spirit was present in 
power to convict and convert. The most impressive service 
in the series was a meeting "for men only," held on Sunday 
afternoon. Notwithstanding the many doubts as to the out- 
come of the meeting, the church was nearly filled with an 
attentive audience. It was a sight at which angels might 
rejoice. Three hundred and fifty men at a gospel meeting ! 
And the spirit was there also. No less than twenty-five stood 
up for Jesus. During the series not less than fifty decided for 
Christ, of which number seventeen united with Grace Church. 

These meetings began a new era in the history of the con- 
gregation. The trials and troubles of the past were rapidly 
dissolving and the future was looming bright and fair. Those 
who had been more or less indifferent in their attendance at 
church were now seen in their regular places every Lord's day. 
Not all came back. Some had so long absented themselves 
from the sanctuary th.it it could not be expected that they 
would return in a day, but it was felt that the fires that had 
been kindled on the altar of so many hearts would soon reach 
out and kindle a flame in the hearts of others. The Sunday 
services were well attended, and often the church would be 
taxed to accommodate the audience. 

Acting upon a suggestion made by several of the members 
of the choir, and backed by the promise of financial assistance, 
plans were at once formed for the purchase of a pipe organ. 
Within a few days sufficient money was pladged to purchase 
an organ. In due time a handsome organ was purchased from 



HISTORY OF GRACE REFORMED CHURCH. 



13 



M. P. Moeller. It has two manuals and about six hundred 
pipes. The organ was consecrated to the Lord on March 23, 
1902, Rev. J. L. Murphy, D. D., preaching the sermon. The 
congregation has always been fortunate in having an excellent 
choir. Mrs, George McCorkle has for years been its leading 
spirit and done much to develop the music of the congregation. 
During the past two years Miss Anna T. Sharpe and Miss Irma 
Whitmore, teachers of music at Catawba College, have been 
the efficient organists. 

During Dr. Stubblebine's pastorate preaching was held in 
Startown, Reinhardt's School House and at Witherspoon's 
School House. At this latter place the hope of having a chapel 
had been long entertained, and it was felt that if anything was 
ever done now was the time to do it. Funds were raised, and 
with donations of material and labor a neat chapel has been 
built at a cost of about $300. 

The congregation had passed through many trying times, 
and the patience of those in charge had often been tested to 
the utmost, but still they held on their way, thinking that 
under new conditions the old spirit of antagonism would pass 
away, but alas! during the past two years the fires of perse- 
cution were kindled again and every effort possible was made 
by enemies to destroy the work and prevent further progress. 
Instead of these evil machinations resulting in the greatly 
desired end, they only brought the people into closer sympathy 
and love. A common enemy caused all to stand firm and allow 
him no entrance into the fold. The consistory and pastor, 
with the entire congregation, with a few unworthy exceptions, 
were in utmost sympathy and harmony. The consistory, as 
an evidence of their appreciation of the services of the pastor, 
voted to raise the salary one hundred dollars, with a promise 
of another one hundred additional at the first of the year. 

Thus no one could see that the repeated attacks of the enemy 
had made any impression on the congregation. Opposition 
was killed and the future was more encouraging than the past 
had been. 

During the two years of the pastorate of Dr. Stubblebine, 
the congregation made wonderful strides in liberality. For 
many years it had maintained its reputation by paying the 



i 4 HISTORY OF GRACE REFORMED CHURCH. 



classical apportionment in full, but during these two years it 
surpassed itself in its contributions to various benevolent causes. 
In all about $500 were contributed for benevolence and $3,015 
for contingent expenses, making an average of $2.50 per com- 
municant member for benevolence and $15 per communicant 
member to contingent expenses per year. 

The enrolled membership is 150, but owing to the fact that 
a large number is non-resident, dwelling some in Texas, New 
York, Maryland and elsewhere, the communicant membership 
is small. Still, those who reside at a distance maintain their 
interest in the church of their spiritual birth and refuse to con- 
nect with other churches. 

Through the will of Major Sidney M. Finger the church had 
been the recipient of an annuity of $75 per year. On the death 
of his wife the church was to inherit a valuable store property 
in town, the income from which would have amounted to $250 
per year. Mrs. Finger died in May, 1903, and the original 
will became operative, and the congregation was looking for- 
ward to the proceeds from this source, when 011 Sunday night, 
October 18, 1903, a fire destroyed the building, along with oth- 
ers. Unfortunately, no insurance had been carried, and the 
church suffered a complete los-. But nothing daunted, the 
congregation will not allow even this great loss to hinder them 
in their work. 

Just a short time prior to the death of Mrs. S. M. Finger, she 
placed a handsome stained glass memorial window in the church 
to the memory of her deceased husband. The Ladies' Aid 
Society has also contracted for a large stained glass window, the 
design to portray Mary annointing the feet of Christ. 

During the month of October, 1903, Rev. Andrew Smith 
revisited the charge and was accorded a royal welcome. Rev. 
Geo. Sorber, of York, Pa., was also a visitor and preached for 
the congregation. 

During the pastorate of Dr. Stubblebine 36 members were 
received into membership, 20 by confirmation and 16 by letter 
and reprofession. The rite of holy baptism was administered 
to 24 children. The pastor officiated at 6 weddings and 10 
funerals. 

The pastorate of Dr. Stubblebine terminated on November 1, 
1903, he moving to Philadelphia. 



YOU MAY REST EASY 

IF YOU BUY YOUR 

DRUGS 



AT 



R. P. FREEZES. 



Goods always fresh and the best. 
Prescriptions carefully compound- 
ed. Have you tried our new : : 



1 




D 



We manufacture it ourselves and 
can vouch for its goodness. If you 
have any doubts, ask Rev. Stubble- 
bine. He has tested it. : : : : 




USUALLY FOUND IN A 

FIRST (LASS DRUG STORE 

WILL BE FOUND AT 



n 



ABERNETHY'S 

Including a full line of Patent Medicines, Toilet Articles, 
Stationery, Candy, and : : : : : : 

SCHOOL BOOKS ENOUGH TO SUPPLY THE COUNTY 

PRESCRIPTIONS CAREFULLY FILLED. 



iARE YOU' 






ED? 



"OBFORE YOU DO LOAD 
up with your winter sup- 
ply of Stationery and other 
Printed Matter, we'd like to 
tell you why you should place 
your order with us. H If H 



THE CATAWBA COUNTY NEWS PRESSES 

BLACKWELDER BLOCK, NEWTON, N. C 



THE OLD ESTBLISHED 



FURNITURE STORE 



Rowe and Herman 

Furniture li ill lift Motfresses, 

SEWING MACHINES, PICTURES FRAMED. 

And the prices ! Well, we will fix that to your 
satisfaction. Drop in and see us 

— ®##® — 

Rowe and Herman 



Clothes Don't Make a Man 

BUT 

ikr Reveal i H oi Moo I is. 

•••• 



IF YOU WOULD BE 

Dressed in the Latest Fashion 

CALL ON 




CLOTHIERS 

•••• 

Fall Styles are now in and there will be no 
trouble to suit the taste of the most exacting. 
Our line of Neckwear is now complete. In fact, 
we have everything in Gent's Furnishings. 

GIL AND EXAMINE OUR GOODS! 




For a Nice Smooth |—»^ f 1 Y T he p ^ hit « g afbef ' 

Shave or Haircut % J J\ 



Nice New Furnishings, Clean Shop, and Sat- 
isfactory Work Guaranteed. 



Next Door to Enterprise Office* j* 
GEORGE B. COULTER, 

TOMBSTONES 



Our work is equal to the best 
and we will guarantee it. . , . 



Just a Reminder %c£r t^t 

P. G. HAVNAER 

Is Conducting 

A General Merchandise Business 

In the 

OWENS BUILDING. 

Stock is new, fresh and up-to-date. Call and be convinced. 



^ T. B. MOOSE, T 

# J? XI OTGlG r apher.* 

■jf NEWTON. N. C. % 
■9r w 

* . £ 

^ We fear i o comparison. Our work is guaranteed to ^ 
^4. give satisfaction. Children's work a specialty. : : : ^ 



M. M. ROWE. 




R. F. REINHARDT. 



WI LiLiIAM MAHAPFEY. 



E. H. CURTIS. Q. A. SETZBR. 

WE'RE m 
THE RACE 

TO WIN. 

Our Goal 

Is to beat the country on prices on 

FURNITURE 

Carpets, Bedding, Pictures, Sewing Machines, Stoves, 
Funeral Supplies, Etc. 



You may think we are boasting, but it's up to you 
to prove that we are not selling goods at prices that 
defy competition. 

—JUST STEP IN AND SEE IIS 



When in town. We'll show you a nice, clean stock 
of new, up-to-date goods. 

Newton Furniture Co. 



You will find us in the new Smith and Mosteller 
Block after November i. 



COMPLAIN NO MORE! 



FRESH MEATS 

Can be had DAILY at 

Smith & Murray's 
New Meat Market 

ALSO 

A 11 11 01 GIEB, 

BUTTER AND EGGS. 

REMEMBER, our stock is all new and fresh, and this is an 
item worth considering in your purchase. Call and see us at 

The Smith Block 

AFTER NOVEMBER FIRST. 



A fine large hall for rent, having seating capacity of 8oo. 




NOW for B U SI NESS. 



Talk's cheap, so we allow our prices to 
speak for us- They tell the tale and 
account for our popularity. ; : : 
You'll be a hard customer if we can 
not vlease you in goods and prices* 
Just try us and be convinced. : : : 



Dry Goods 

Groceries 

Shoes 



Rhyne (®l Co. 



St. Hubert Inn 



NEWTON, 1ST. C. 
E. R. STEWART, Prop. 

A modern, well-equipped hostlery, where the traveling public will receive 
courteous treatment. 



THE SKYLAND INN 

BLOWING ROCK, N. C. 

Situated at one of the most delightful mountain regions in the South 
Climate unsurpassed. Board first-class. Open June to October. 

E. R. STEWART, PROP. 



J. W. HARDISTER, 
Jeweler and Optician 



If I don't have what you want, I can get it. But I think 
you will find my stock of . : : : : : 

WATCHES, DIAMONDS 

AND 

silverware! 

COMPLETE AND UP-TO-DATE. 
— — •••• 

CHRISTMAS GOODS SOON COMING. 
ALL KINDS OF REPAIR WORK. 



IF 



Honest Dealing and Square Treatment is what 
you are looking for : : : : : 

JOSEPH GEMAYBL 
is 

YOUR MAN. 

"Little Joe" is always affable, and his store con- 
?• tains Staple and Fancy Groceries and a general 
line of Merchandise. 



JUST TRY HIM ONCE 

• I-, • • • • r-. « - • • .Ait r-. • - — ^ • • .-, • « 



Built in 1888. Daily Capacity, 100 Bbls. Elevator Capacity, 20,000 Bu. 

^Newton Roller Millie 

G. A. WARLICK. Prop. 

MANUFACTURER OP 

FULL • ROLLER • FLOUR • AND • MEAL 

• 

BRANDS : 

WARLICK' S BEST, 
SILVER LEAF, 

BELLE OF NEWTON, 

PRIDE OF CATAWBA, 
HORNET'S NEST, 

SNOW BALL, 

CHOICE FAMILY, 

— • — 

We pay cash for wheat or exchange flour for same. Address : 

NEWTON ROLLER MILL, NEWTON, N. C. 



If We Can't Supply Your Wants 

Who Can? 

TO SELL 

GROCERIES 




LUSIVE 



IS OUR 




EVERYTHING 

GENERALLY FOUND IN A 

FIRST CLASS .* GROCERY * STORE.* 

WILL BE FOUND HERE. 



We make a Specialty of GILT EDGE BUTTER 



J. F. SMYRE, Grocer, 



GEO. MOOSE 

(SUCCESSOR TO D. F. MOOSE.) 

mmmsmsmsmm dealer in 



P L OW S 

DRILLS 
WAGONS 

BUGGIES 
GUANOS 

AGENT FOR 
McCormiek Harvesting Machine Co. 

IIOOSIER DRILLS, 
DEERE DISC PLOWS 
AND R0(K HILL BOWIES 

NEWTON, - JV. C. 



J Too Busy ^ I 

To stop and write an advertisement to tell j, 

what we've got in detail, ^ 

s But^e I 

^ If you want anything in the line of 

| Hardware § 

^ We're the people you are looking for. We js 

sell also Buggies, Studebaker Wagons, and 

^ Farming Implements of all kinds. You'll ^ 

"5r miss it if you pass us by. ^ 

jj SHUFORD HARDWARE CO. J 

j Newton Hosiery Mill J 

4 NEWTON, N. C. # 

MANUFACTURER OF ^ 

$ "c^e cB facd (£icw Stcclkn % 

^Sr (pat.).. sf!r 

$r I W@n($ , Xadito amd dlizns ^ 

* 1 Q r *- 

| ■bHH Prices, 10-25c % 

^ flHHiHHu/e Sell Direct to Retail Trade ^ 

* Newton Hosiery Mill # 



D. J. CARPENTER, Owner 



) 




p 

J 



We Say: 

Here we are again, .sure to bob 
up serenely, and to be found at 
our old place of business. : : : : 
Perhaps you don't know what 
kind of a store we keep. : : : : 
Well, drop in on us any day 
and we will take pleasure in 
showing you our store and our 
goods. 

We have everything usually 
found in a : : : : 



GENERAL .„ MERCHANDISE * STORE. 



cffic Slew ten ctCooi&iy 31tiiC Stoic, 



I You Know Me 

Ernest Moore 



f; Shaving and Haircutting is my busi- 
ness, and I can prove to you that I 
know my business if you will call. : : : 
My place is clean and neat. 



Yours to Serve. 



Ernest 



oore, 



ZKB. H. YOUNT. 



A. M. CORPENING. 



^Yount ^ Corperiimg^ 

NEWTON, jsr. a 



LIVERY, PEED AND SALE STABLES,* 



TRANSIENT TRADE A SPECIALTY. 



Chas. A Little, 



S DENTAL SURGEON. 

# Vance Yount Building, 



NEWTON. 



N. C. 



A. A. Shuford, Pres. J. C. Smith, V. Pres. A. H. Crowell, Cash. 



of fie Sfmfoicl dZoMcnoS c&an/i 

(No. 6075.) 

NEWTON, N. C. 

ORGANIZED JANUARY 1, 1902. 



With ample capital and advantageous connections, we 
feel able to render efficient and prompt service, and 
solicit patronage from all. Small accounts receive the 
same care and attention as large ones. Absolute 
secree}' maintained as to the affairs of all customers. 



A. A. Shuford, 
J. F. Snvyre, 



DIRECTORS : 

J C. Smith, 
S. Rhyne, 



G. A. Warlick, 
A. H. Crowell. 



J. B. LITTLE, D. D. S.. 

DENTIST. 

Yount & Shrum Building. Phone 4 J. 





M. S. SMYRE 

Makes his bow to the public in a new role as a dealer in 

Hardware ! 



We propose doing business on 

fl OTP 



When in need of anything in the line of 

HARDWARE, 
Farm Implements, 
Guns and Pistols, 
Etc, Etc, Etc., 




GIVE ME A CALL. 



Next to Gaither's Store. 



officr SZzwtcn (BoUon Q)Tli((*> State 



Dry Goods 

AT LOWEST PRICES, 

Clothing 

POPULAR STYLES AT POPULAR PRICES. 



SHOES 

QUALITIES LIKE OUR'S TELL. 
PRICES LIKE OUR'S SELL. 

Furniture 

GOOD VALUES FOR A LITTLE MONEY, 

GROCERIES 

ENERYTHING USED ON THE TABLE. 



All goods guaranteed as represented. We keep noth- 
ing but the best goods and our prices are as low as the 
lowest. . . . Thanking you for past patronage 
and hoping by good treatment to merit a continuance 
of the same, we are 

Your Friends, 



dZzwfon (£cUcnc)1Zi$A Stczz 



Date Due 










DEC 
































































































































































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